2 | Automation & Integration

2 | Automation & Integration

Flowte Social 

Manage Social Accounts
Before you can get your social media data on your dashboard, you need to add/connect your social accounts to your Social Dashboard management area. Navigate to Fan Engagement > Social



Connect a Social Account  

1. You can add multiple social accounts to your Social Dashboard by clicking each button in this section.
  1. After clicking on each button, you will be redirected to its permission request form on that social network.
  2. You confirm the permissions requested and will be redirected back to Social Dashboard.
  3. Finally, you can find the account added in section 2 displaying some information.
2. This section lists all of your previously added Social Accounts including some information about them.


To disconnect a social account from your dashboard, click on the "disconnect" button on its item.

Post an Update

You can post status updates to Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, LinkedIn and Pinterest or multiple accounts by clicking "Post an update" button from the top navigation bar.


1. Select/check the accounts you want to post your status message to from the list.
2. If you want to share a link along with your message, paste it here.
3. Write your status message in this box.
4. Drag & drop or browse your images from your computer to the form.
5. If you want to schedule your post to be sent by a later time, set the Schedule date field.
6. Click the Send button to post the message immediately.


Manage Scheduled Posts

Here, you can manage your scheduled status posts. You can stop sending your scheduled posts to your social account by deleting them from this table. You can also view the post details or check its sending status on this table.


Automation and Workflowtes

Marketing automation workflow examples 

Flowte automation allows you to eliminate manual processes. Through workflowtes, personalised and targeted emails can be sent automatically to customers based on pre-determined triggers you set. This allows you to save time by automating the process of increasing spend per fan and frequency of attendance. Automation can also assit with attracting new first time customers


Early Bird Discount 
An Early Bird discount is often offered before the full ticket fee comes into effect. It’s used to build buzz and reward people who are willing to commit early to attending your event. Early bird pricing requires a deadline or a limited number of tickets to be available in order to drive sales. You can send out an early bird email to previous customers offering a discount if they buy tickets for a match early.  


Early Entry Email  
By creating a workflow for early arrivers where they receive a discount code for particular products you have on sale, it encourages your customers to visit your store, where they might find something of interest to them and hopefully make a purchase. For example, everyone who arrives at the game 1 hour before kickoff receives a discount code of 10% to use at the club store. By doing so you get fans into the stadiums earlier and increase customer spend.  

Up-selling Email Before a Game 
An email is the perfect opportunity to ask for an up-sell. The very best emails can convince the customer that you're just trying to help, and that you're just not pushing to make more money. By analysing customer data you can identify what each customer spends their money on game day and see what their last purchase was. The next thing you need to do is create an email to let them know your forthcoming recommendation has something to do with the item they last purchased. If they were happy with their last purchase they'll probably stick around to see what else you can offer them.  


Re-engagement Email  
Typically you will have customers that haven't been to a game for a few weeks or more. These could be season ticket holders or once off customers. By creating a workflow where, customers who haven't been at a game for a specific period of time (for example 4 weeks/games) receive an email offering them a discount. By doing so you are showing the customer you value and appreciate them whilst also giving them a good reason to come to another game in the near future. 

Creating a workflow task 
NB workflowtes are only sent to contacts who are “opted in” per gdpr requirements
1. Go to Fan Engagement  > Automation 
2. Click Add Workflowte. 
3. In the New Task page, do the following:
 
a. Insert your workflowte name.
b. Enter your descritption.
c. Select your trigger type. This determines when your email will be sent.


Trigger 1: Time after a tag added to contact. Contacts with this tag will receive an email. 

1. Select contact tag: this is the tag associated to this workflowte rule. 
2. Number: set the amount you like. 
3. Select the timeframe, minutes, hours, days weeks, months. 
4. Select the action.  
a. Send email to contact 
b. Send email to me 
5. Select your campaign.  
6. Click Save Workflowte 

Trigger 2: Time before an event. An email will be sent to customers before an event/events. 
1. Select event: this is the event associated to this workflowte rule. 
2. Number: set the amount you like. 
3. Select the timeframe, minutes, hours, days weeks, months. 
4. Select the action.  
a.Send email to contact 
b. Send email to me 
5. Select your campaign.  
6. Click Save Workflowte 

Trigger 3: Time after an event. An email will be sent to customers after an event/events. 
1. Select event: this is the event associated to this workflowte rule. 
2. Number: set the amount you like. 
3. Select the timeframe, minutes, hours, days weeks, months. 
4. Select the action.  
a.Send email to contact 
b. Send email to me 
5. Select your campaign.  
6. Click Save Workflowte 

Trigger 4: Time after a successful scan for event. An email will be sent to customers after they have successfully scanned their ticket. 
1. Select event: this is the event associated to this workflowte rule. 
2. Number: set the amount you like. 
3. Select the timeframe, minutes, hours, days weeks, months. 
4. Select the action.  
a.Send email to contact 
b. Send email to me 
5. Select your campaign.  
6. Click Save Workflowte 

Trigger 5: Time before an event a successful scan is made. An email will be sent to customers before they have successfully scanned their ticket. 
1. Select event: this is the event associated to this workflowte rule. 
2. Number: set the amount you like. 
3. Select the timeframe, minutes, hours, days weeks, months. 
4. Select the action.  
a.Send email to contact 
b. Send email to me 
5. Select your campaign.  
6. Click Save Workflowte 

Trigger 6: Time after an event is bought. An email will be sent to customers after they have successfully purchased a ticket for an event. 
1. Select event: this is the event associated to this workflowte rule. 
2. Number: set the amount you like. 
3. Select the timeframe, minutes, hours, days weeks, months. 
4. Select the action.  
a.Send email to contact 
b. Send email to me 
5. Select your campaign.  
6. Click Save Workflowte 

Trigger 7: Time after item with is bought. An email will be sent to customers after they have successfully purchased an item with a specific tag.
1. Select event: this is the event associated to this workflowte rule. 
2. Select the contact tag.  
3. Number: set the amount you like. 
4. Select the timeframe, minutes, hours, days weeks, months. 
5. Select the action.  
a.Send email to contact 
b. Send email to me 
6. Select your campaign.  
7. Click Save Workflowte 


Purchase Notifications
Finally, you can set up notifications of a customer's successful purchase to be sent to you via email. For this, you will need to:

1. Go to Fan Engagement > Automation 
2. Click Add Workflowte. 
3. In the New Task page, do the following:
a. Insert your workflowte name.
b. Enter your descritption.
c. Select Trigger 7: Time after event/product with is bought. 
4. Select event: this is the event associated to this workflowte rule. 
5. Select the contact tag.  
6. Number: set the amount you like. 
7. Select the timeframe, minutes, hours, days weeks, months. 
8. Select the action: Send email to me. 'Me' in this case means the Flowte user you are currently logged into. 
9. Select your campaign.  
10. Click Save Workflowte 

You can personalize this as needed, for example if you only wanreceive notifications for event x or product y but not for all events or products, by deselecting all but the event/product you wish to be notified about, like so: 



Flowte Integrations

Navigate to Fan Engagement > Integrations 


Google Analytics Integration

Fill in your google analytics id to the relevant input box > Click "Save Integration Settings" 

Google Adwords Integration 

Fill in your google analytics id to the relevant input box > Click "Save Integration Settings" 

Google Tag Manager Integration                       
                                     
To use this feature you will need to have added your Google Analytics code. You will also need to have linked  
your Google Analytics account with your Adwords account.  Once you meet the pre-requisites above you can follow this guide to get the Conversion data from Adwords and 
add it to your Flowte account in Settings > Account Info > Integrations. 


1 | Log in to Adwords and click the three dots located in the top right then Conversions

2 | Create new conversion and choose website


3 | Fill the form on screen

4 | Click create and continue

5 | Copy the details to Flowte as per below
 

Please note that Flowte will automatically set the correct language of the customer, currency and the value of the completed order.

PCA Predict Address Look Up Integration           
                                                                             
Navigate to Fan Engagement > Integrations  
Fill out all relevant information > Click "Save Integration Settings" 

Facebook Pixel Integration


How to Install Facebook Pixel via Google Tag Manager

If you are using paid advertising to acquire new traffic, it’s very likely that you already use Facebook ads. However, if you don’t measure the effectiveness of your ad campaigns and just burn dollars hoping that maybe something is working, you’re doing it wrong. If you use Facebook ads to acquire traffic, you need to use Facebook Pixel to measure the success of your campaigns. Whenever a visitor converts, you should track that conversion (e.g., lead, purchase, etc.) with the pixel. In this guide, we will show you how to install Facebook Pixel with Google Tag Manager (not only basic pageviews but also other things, like events). The topic is quite extensive. P.S. some screenshots in this article show the older version of the GTM preview mode


A Quick Introduction to Facebook Pixel
Facebook Pixel is a solution created by Facebook that allows you to measure user/visitor behavior on your site and then track conversions or build audiences based on the data you send.
Once you place certain JavaScript code snippets on your site (and activate them based on user/visitor behavior), Facebook will start getting data. I will not dive deeper into the possibilities (because this blog post is more focused on the implementation). But if you are super new to FB Pixel, you can get more information here.
In a nutshell, by using Facebook Pixel you will be able to:
  • Create custom audiences for remarketing purposes (e.g. retarget those who have scrolled at least 50% and spent at least a minute or those who added a product to a cart but did not purchase).
  • Track conversions. Conversion is an important action (to the business) that a visitor/user completed, e.g., signup, subscription, purchase, etc. By tracking conversions, you will be able to tell Facebook that X visitor has completed the action that you desired.  This means that your reports will show which ads are more effective in reaching your goals and which ones aren’t.
  • Additional targeting opportunities. By tracking certain interactions (like leads or purchases), you can instruct Facebook to find more lookalike people and show your ads to them based on those who have already converted on your site.
Let’s put all the fluff aside and focus on the nitty-gritty side — technical implementation: how to add Facebook Pixel to your site with Google Tag Manager, how to send events, how to implement advanced matching, user properties, etc.
 
How to get Facebook Pixel code?
First things first, let’s go to the Facebook Pixel Business manager and get the Pixel ID (that will be needed in the next chapters of this blog post.
Disclaimer: Facebook is constantly changing the user interface here, therefore, there is a high chance that my screenshots will not match what you actually see. In fact, once I had a case where 4 people in my GTM workshop saw different versions of the interface at the same time. So, if you don’t find a certain option, just keep looking.
In the top right corner, click the Menu icon and go to Events Manager.

Then go to  Data Sources and choose the Pixel that you’re interested in.

If you don’t have any Pixels yet, click the Set Up Pixel and follow all the necessary steps.
In one of the steps, Facebook will offer you several ways to add the pixel. Close this window for now.

Your main goal, for now, is to get the Pixel ID that looks like this (of course, the value will be different):

Once you get it, copy it (because we’ll need it in the next chapter of this blog post).
 
#1. How To Install Facebook Pixel with Google Tag Manager: Pageview
Back in the older days (pre-2019), the only way to install Facebook Pixel via Google Tag Manager was by using the Custom HTML tag template. This meant that you had to work directly with a JavaScript code, edit it a bit, etc.
These days, things are much simpler and more elegant because Simo Ahava has created a Facebook Pixel Custom Template and shared it with everyone. It will make the entire FB Pixel tag management process more convenient and less prone to errors.
Update: Later this template was acquired by Facebook (facebookarchive). Nevertheless, it is still the same template. Some screenshots of this article will still show “gtm-templates-simo-ahava” as the owner.
Also, more new Facebook Pixel templates have been introduced to the GTM community gallery lately. I haven’t worked with them so I can’t tell if they are good or not.
 
#1.1. Add Facebook Pixel Custom Template
If you go to Tags > New (in Google Tag Manager) and search for “Facebook”, you will not find any tag template. That’s because, by default, no such tag exists in the GTM container. You have to add it manually.
Luckily, there is a very convenient feature called Community Template Gallery where anyone in the community (who can code) can create custom templates of Variables or Tags.
In Google Tag Manager, go to Templates > Tag Templates > Search Gallery and in the search field, enter Facebook.


You will see this template, click it and add it to your Workspace. Once you do that, a new template will appear in the Tags > New > Custom section and you will be able to reuse it multiple times in multiple tags in the same container.


 
#1.2. Facebook Pixel Pageview Tag
Everything starts with the basic implementation of the Facebook pixel. In other guides (especially in the older ones) found online, you might see a term called Facebook Pixel Base Code (or something similar). The next several steps that I’m going to demonstrate explain exactly that (but without using the term Base Code).
In GTM, go to Tags > New > Facebook Pixel and enter the following settings (if some fields are not visible in the screenshot, I did not change anything there):



In the Facebook Pixel ID(s) field, enter the Pixel ID you copied in the How to get Facebook Pixel ID? chapter. Thanks to this field, GTM will know to which exact FB ad account to send this data.
For now, leave all the other settings as they are (for now).
Set the tag to fire on All Pages.
 
#1.3. Constant Variable for the Pixel ID
Spoiler alert: for each interaction you want to track with the Facebook Pixel, we will need to create a separate FB Pixel tag.  In every tag, you will need to define a Facebook Pixel ID.
Eventually, you might end up with 50 (or even more) tags that send data to Facebook. This means that you will have to manually insert the Pixel ID 50+ times. But what if one day, you have to switch to another Pixel ID? You will need to manually change the ID 50+ times.


To make things more optimal, you could create a GTM variable that contains your FB Pixel ID and then just reuse the same variable every time you need it. Once you need to change the Pixel ID, you’ll need to do that just once — in the Variable.
In GTM, you go Variables > User-defined Variables > New > Constant and paste your Facebook Pixel’s ID.

Save the Variable. Then open the previously created Facebook Pixel pageview tag, and insert the Constant Variable instead of plain Pixel ID.

 
#1.4. Test the Facebook Pixel Tag
Now, it’s time to make sure that you have implemented everything correctly.
GTM Preview and Debug mode. In GTM, enable the Preview and Debug mode, then refresh the page where you want to install Facebook Pixel with Google Tag Manager.
At the bottom of the screen, a debug console will appear. Click the Pageview event and you should see that your Facebook Pixel tag has fired.

 
Facebook Pixel Helper. The previous tip does not mean that everything was sent to Facebook Pixel properly! There are other places we need to check. One of them is Facebook Pixel helper. Install it and you will see this icon appear in the top right corner of your Chrome browser. Once you refresh the page AND if Facebook Pixel is implemented on a page, its color will change to blue and you will see a number within that icon.
Click that icon and let’s check. We see that a PageView was tracked and there is a green check mark icon next to it. That’s good! If there was a loader or yellow icon, that’d mean a possible problem. But a green icon is exactly what we are looking for.

 
Facebook Pixel Reports
In Facebook Business Manager, go to Events Manager > Data Sources > Select your Pixel and then Test Events.


Enter the URL of your website (if I was working with my site, I would enter https://www.flowte.com) and click Open Website. After you are redirected to your own website, go back to the Test Events of your Pixel and check whether you see Pageviews coming from your own device. If nothing appears, go back to your site and refresh the page once again.


If everything is fine, this means that you have implemented Facebook Pixel with Google Tag Manager correctly.
 
#2. Other options on how to install Facebook Pixel with Google Tag Manager
There are two other options on how to install the pixel but I’ll mention them just very briefly (because we still have a lot of material to cover):
Manually by using the Custom HTML tag (semi-recommended). It was a recommended method before early 2019 (when the Custom Template was not available yet).
“Done for you”. I don’t recommend this one.
 
#2.1. Manual installation using the Custom HTML tag
In a nutshell, you just need to copy the entire Facebook pixel code to the Custom HTML tag, do modifications directly in its code (if you needed) and you also had to handle Tag Sequencing to make sure that Facebook Pixel base code is already loaded before you try to send some event (or pageview) to it.
Where can you get the full Facebook Pixel code? Go to your FB Pixel in the Events Manager, open your pixel and in the top right corner click Set Up > Install Pixel.

Then choose Manually add pixel code to website and copy the main code:



In Google Tag Manager, go to Tags > New > Custom HTML tag and paste the code. <noscript> code is useless there, so you are free to remove it.
 
#2.2. “Done for you”
When you try to get the full Facebook Pixel JavaScript code, FB offers you several options on how to install the pixel. One of the options is “Google Tag Manager”.



We highly encourage you NOT to choose this option. You see, this built-in installation option via Google Tag Manager is a bit tricky.
You will need to grant Facebook access to your Google Tag Manager container (it can add, delete tags and do all the other sorts of things. And I don’t want to give that kind of permission.)
When you grant access, Facebook will automatically add the Pixel code to your container and will immediately publish your container (regardless of whether you have other (possibly untested) changes.
The name of that tag will probably not match your current naming convention.
So, in order to get just one tag created in your container that fires on all pages, giving Facebook access is not a good option.
That’s why you should not choose the “Google Tag Manager” option (regardless of how counter-intuitive this sounds). When you install the container yourself, you will still use GTM and will have full control over what happens in your container.

 
#3. How to Track Events with Facebook Pixel and Google Tag Manager
Up until this point, we managed to do a basic Facebook Pixel implementation via GTM. But Pageviews alone don’t tell a lot about what a visitor/user is doing on your site. Did the visitor just landed on a page and left? Or did he/she clicked something, scrolled, submitted a form, made a purchase?
That’s where event tracking is super important. Only by providing Facebook with additional and quality data, you can expect to get the most out of it.
When it comes to event tracking with Facebook Pixel, there are two types of events:
Standard
Custom
 
#3.1 Standard vs Custom Facebook Pixel events
According to the official Facebook documentation, standard events are the most common actions that a visitor/user can do on a site. Facebook recognizes and supports those events across all ad products. These events can be used to build audiences and optimize conversions.
Here are the standard events that FB pixel supports:
PageView
AddPaymentInfo
AddToCart
AddToWishlist
CompleteRegistration
Contact
CustomizeProduct
Donate
FindLocation
InitiateCheckout
Lead
Purchase
Schedule
Search
StartTrial
SubmitApplication
Subscribe
ViewContent

The titles are pretty much self-explanatory. So if you want to track an interaction that is mentioned in that list, definitely use the Standard Event for that.
Custom events are interactions that do not fall under the categorization of standard events. For example:

Scroll
Time on page (e.g. when you fire an event after a visitor spends 5 minutes on a page)
Viewed a certain element
Outbound link click
Video play, etc.
It’s all up to your imagination.
 
#3.2 A Tag + a trigger for a Standard Event
Let’s say that you want to track when someone enters his/her email on your landing page. Looking at the list of possible standard events, this one should be considered as a Lead. Let’s create a tag that will send the “Lead” event to Facebook.
In Google Tag Manager, go to Tags > New > Facebook Pixel and enter the following settings:


As you can see, in the Event Name field we chose Lead. For now, keep all the other fields empty. The other thing that you will need to define is a trigger (a condition when this tag must fire).
This very much depends on what kind of interaction do you want to track. Triggers are a totally different story that requires you to learn a lot.
If we are interested in tracking leads, obviously, we have to deal with forms. While I will not dive deeper into how to do that, here’s a very extensive guide on how to track forms with Google Tag Manager.
If you feel that you struggling with tracking interactions on your own, you might need to ask a developer for help. A developer will have to push data to the Data Layer and you will need to use Custom Event trigger to catch that data.
As for the lead, let’s imagine that a visitor (after entering email) is redirected to a “Thank you” page www.example.com/thank-you. We could create a Pageview trigger that fires if the Page URL contains /thank-you.


But keep in mind that form tracking is SO MUCH full of nuances and your trigger might look very much different.
 
#3.3 Test the Standard Facebook Pixel Event
After you have created a tag and a trigger, save everything. Then refresh (or enable) the GTM preview and debug mode, refresh the page where you want to track that event with Facebook Pixel. Complete that interaction. In my example, that interaction is entering an email on a landing page and then being redirected to a “Thank you” page.
Since my trigger is based on a Page View, I click that in my preview and debug console…


… and then check whether my Facebook Pixel tag (related to a lead) has fired. If yes, that’s a good start! If you are struggling with debugging Google Tag Manager setups, read this guide.
The next step (just like it was with the FB Pageview tag) is to check the Facebook Pixel Helper. After the Lead tag has fired, click the Pixel Helper’s icon and check whether you see a green icon next to a Lead event.



The final step is to test the reports in Facebook Business Manager. Go to Events Manager > Data Sources > Choose your Pixel and then click Test events. Check whether you see the Lead event there.


 
#3.4 A Tag + a trigger for a Custom Event
In this example, let say that we want to track whenever someone presses the Play button in an embedded Youtube video player that we have on our landing page. First, let’s create a tag. Go to Tags > New > Facebook Pixel and enter the following settings.



We want this tag to fire only when someone clicks the Play button, therefore, we need to create a Youtube video trigger for that. Click the Triggering section in your Facebook Pixel tag and then click the Plus icon in the top right corner. Then click Trigger Configuration > Youtube video and enter the following settings (you can add more if you want, like Progress)):



Save the trigger and it will be automatically added to your Facebook Pixel tag.
By the way, if you want to add some additional data to the custom event, you can do that by going to Object Properties and adding any custom parameters you need, for example (the variables I’ve used are both built-in in GTM. You just need to enable them in Variables > Built-in Variables > Configure.):


 
#3.5 Test the Custom Event
The testing principle is exactly the same as it was described in #2.3. chapter of this blog post (related to testing the Standard Events). Your goal here is to make sure that:
The Facebook Pixel tag fires
Facebook Pixel helper shows the green icon next to that event
Test Events section in Facebook Events Manager is showing the event that you’ve just sent
  
 
#4. Send additional parameters to Facebook Pixel with Google Tag Manager
With Facebook Pixel, you can send not only events but also additional values (e.g. order total, the video title, etc.). In fact, in the previous example of the custom video event, we have already done that.
You can find a full list of supported standard parameters here.  The majority of them are optional. If you are working with a custom event, feel free to come up with any custom parameter you want.
Speaking of Standard Events, only the Purchase event requires currency and value.

Also, by looking at the documentation, you can see which fields are expected by Facebook. I mean, if you send the AddToCart event and want to send some custom data (like product price, etc.), the Facebook pixel will expect content_ids, content_name, content_type, contents, currency, value. None of these are required when it comes to AddToCart.
 
#4.1. Example – Purchase Tracking with Additional Parameters
Imagine that after a visitor makes a purchase, he/she is redirected to a “Thank you” page. On that page, I’ve asked a developer to push the transaction data to the Data Layer.
Here’s that code snippet that a developer activated (that contains the transaction info). I took it from my other guide about the implementation of Standard Ecommerce via GTM.
<script> window.dataLayer = window.dataLayer || []; dataLayer.push({ 'event' : 'transaction', 'currencyCode' : 'EUR', 'transactionId': '1234', 'transactionAffiliation': 'Acme Clothing', 'transactionTotal': 38.26, 'transactionTax': 1.29, 'transactionShipping': 5, 'transactionProducts': [{ 'sku': 'DD44', 'name': 'T-Shirt', 'category': 'Apparel', 'price': 11.99, 'quantity': 1 }] }); </script>
Keep in mind that this code contains dummy values. A developer should write some functions and custom logic in his/her code that replace dummy values with actual data of the purchase.
Looking at the official FB Pixel documentation, two fields are required:
Revenue
Currency
Let’s send them. Looking at my sample Data Layer code, there are two keys we’re interested in: currencyCode and transactionTotal. We could reuse them and send their values to Facebook Pixel. To do that, first, let’s create two Data Layer Variables with the following settings:


Important: those values are case-sensitive, therefore, enter currencyCode, not currencycode.
Then, create a Facebook Pixel Tag with the following configuration:

As you can see, I’ve inserted both variables in the Object Properties section. On the left side, you can see the name of the parameter that Facebook is expecting (currency and value) and we set our Data Layer Variables as values of those two parameters.
In order words, we will send “EUR” as a currency (because “EUR” is the value of the currencyCode in the Data Layer) and 38.26 because that’s the value of the transactionTotal in the Data Layer).
Next, click the Triggering section in your Facebook Pixel tag and then click the Plus icon in the top right corner (we will create a new trigger). Then click Trigger Configuration > Custom. We want that dataLayer.push (that contains the transaction data) to use as a trigger.
In the Custom Event Trigger, enter transaction event name (because that is the value of the ‘event’ key in that dataLayer.push).

Save the trigger and then save the tag.
 
#4.2. Test the event with additional parameters
Now, it’s time to test the setup. Refresh your Preview and Debug mode, go to your website, refresh it and complete a purchase. By now, you should already know the drill:
Check whether the Facebook Pixel tag has fired upon the purchase (in my case, I should click the transaction event in the debug console and then check whether the tag has indeed fired).



Check whether the Purchase event has a green icon next to it. Also, expand the event to see if all the parameters were sent as intended.


Check whether the event with custom parameters is displayed in the Test Events section of your FB Events Manager interface. 

Upselling & Cross Selling


Upselling is essentially the sales technique where sellers influence customers to purchase more expensive items or upgrades or add-ons, in hopes of making a more profitable sale. It usually requires marketing more profitable services by exposing the customer base to more options that they may not have considered yet.

Cross-selling, on the other hand, is when sellers sell an additional service or product to an existing customer. The objective of this practice is to either increase the income from the client or to protect the relationship. With this in mind, it’s important to ensure that the additional product or service that you’re selling is supposed to improve the client somehow.
Setting up on an Event
Navigate to Ticketing > Events > Your Event
1. Go to the Event Info page
2. Click on the "Choose Events/Products To Upsell" dropdown


3. Multi-select events and products to offer


4. Click "Confirm" and then "Save" in the top right corner

How Upsells Display
Online

Back Office